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2017: Our Year in Review

Dear readers of Doctors Who Create, Another year has passed by quickly, and we’ve been excited to share new content and ideas from writers around the world with you in this past year. We remain ever-thankful to you for being a part of the Doctors

Empowering Women in Emergency Medicine

Dr. Dara Kass works at NYU/ Bellevue Hospital and is the founder of FemInEM, an open access resource that allows members to discuss, discover, and affect the journey of women working in emergency medicine. Dr. Kass was previously the director of undergraduate medical education at

going

i remember my first time with dying it came suddenly and stayed i didn’t know how a dot could be a line i feel it surreally, still today the murmurs in the hallway easily blending into the cycles of daily caretaking we went through the

The Conversation

Joe sat wheelchair-bound in the exam room, pale and gaunt with his nasal oxygen cannula hissing at high flow. He was a shell of the sturdy working man who I met less than a year ago, when he regularly accompanied his wife to her appointments.

The Doctor as Patient, Part II of VI

This is part II of a series by Dr. Erika Landau that documents her experience as a physician battling breast cancer. Link to Part I  I am still young, I eat healthy, I exercise, and I do not drink, never smoked, and never even tried

My Doctor

Mr. R. is 68 years old and has not seen a physician in many years. “I’m old school—I never went to the doctor unless something was wrong.” At his age, he is beginning to see his friends develop various ailments and decided a check-up wouldn’t

Provocations on Infrastructure: Energy

The alarm rings through the hallway and resonates with the chorus of vibrating beepers. One can almost feel the adrenaline in the room as everyone perks up their ears, stands up, and rushes out of the room. An emergency is afoot. Someone is dying, or

Brainstem Cross Sections

The brainstem, the gateway between the body and the brain, contains a bundle of functional pathways that move in three dimensions through its three parts: the medulla, pons, and midbrain. Learning to “localize the lesion” in the brainstem involves mapping neurological symptoms onto this tangled

Stanford MedX Day 2: Designing for Change

This is second in a three-article series. To read about Stanford MedX Day 1 first, click here. How do we design better care experiences for both patient and provider? Today at the MedX conference at Stanford, the day started with 2 minutes of silent meditation—in a

Stanford MedX Day 1: A day of thirds

This weekend is my first time attending Stanford MedX, a conference designed around innovation in healthcare. I’m here representing Doctors Who Create, and blogging about some of the things that are making me think. One of the things that excited me about this conference is

The Doctor as Patient, Part I of VI

The mom in my office was exhausted; three weeks without sleeping will not make anyone happy. I was trying to comfort her, making her understand that she has to give up the superwoman syndrome and rest.  Leave pride aside and get help for at least

“When I Die, Let me Live” Podcast Premiere

“When I Die, Let Me Live” is a podcast where we have the immense privilege of connecting with people about the taboo, fraught, delicate, but universal topic of death. We’ll invite you into the lives of our guests, many of whom are patients, caregivers, and

Submit to “Process: a book project” by May 1st

I’m working on a book project that will focus on medical trainees’ journeys through medicine, especially the non-academic, emotional aspects of their journeys. The dream is for the book to include submissions from medical students and residents all over the world and to be a